Home Inspection Tip – Five Home Maintenance Areas That Can Snag the Sale of Your Home

The last thing you want when you’re selling your home is to discover problems that could jeopardize the sale. While a home inspection will reveal the condition of your home, you won’t have to be afraid of issues that come up if you’ve kept your home well maintained. With good home maintenance you can avoid some of the most common imperfections and problems found by home inspectors.

Home maintenance tasks are often put off for various reasons, such as lack of time, lack of money, or simply lack of interest. However, when it comes time to sell your home and you know buyers are looking, it’s time to take care of business.

The little things that nag you may be major issues to a prospective home buyer, and they could cost you the sale. You can eliminate the vast majority of problems and stress by checking on five important areas.

1. Dirty filter and coils in the furnace, air conditioning or heat pump system. Having your heating and cooling system serviced by a professional once a year should take care of this problem. You should also clean or replace filters every one to three months, depending on the requirements of your system. This is important for long life of your unit, efficiency, fuel savings, and the assurance you’ll have proper heating and cooling in your home.

2. Poor Caulking of Ceramic Tile in the Tub and Shower Area. It can cost thousands of dollars to repair or replace a rotted shower wall. You can avoid this by caulking tiled areas for a few dollars. If you can see a crack in the calk or grout, you know it’s large enough for water to get in.

3. Ground Fault Circuit Interrupters (GFCI) not Functioning properly. Those electrical outlets with the “Press” and “Test” buttons are GFCI’s. They’re very important in reducing or preventing the chance of electrocution. Push the “Test” button to see if the GFCI’s are working as they should. If not, they’re inexpensive to replace and should only take about fifteen minutes to install. If you have questions or concerns, call a professional electrician.

4. Wood rot. This is a big one, and it can snag the sale of your home. What inspector wouldn’t love to report that a home is free of wood rot and structural damage? Selling your home can be made simpler and more enjoyable if you are knowledgeable about preventative maintenance. For example, have a good moisture barrier under the crawl space. Keep an eye out for leaks around windows, doors and the roof.

5. Amateur Workmanship. Did you weekend handyman brother-in-law help you remodel the kitchen last year? When amateurs do home projects, often the materials used aren’t right for the intended purpose, or they’re of poor quality, or both. Inspections are seldom performed or permits obtained when such projects are done by amateurs. Unfortunately amateur work can complicate a closing.

Be sure to keep your home in good shape to make things go smoothly for your home inspector and for the selling process as a whole. You’ll be glad you did.

Home Inspection Tips – Radon Testing For Sellers and Buyers

A home inspection is important whether you’re buying or selling a home. Where does radon testing fit into the picture?

Let’s look first at considerations from a home seller’s perspective. If your inspector or another qualified professional has already tested your home for radon, the buyer wants assurance the testing was done correctly. She may ask that testing be redone if certain conditions aren’t met.

Did testing comply with the EPA radon checklist or your state’s protocol? Was testing done within the past two years? Have you made any renovations on your home since testing was done? Does your prospective buyer want to live in a basement or level lower than where testing was done?

She may also ask for a new test if your state or local government requires the disclosure of radon information to buyers and that disclosure hasn’t been made.

If you haven’t yet had your home tested for radon, have it done as soon as possible. Test in the lowest level of the home that can be regularly occupied. Test in an area such as a basement or playroom area if that area could be used by your buyer.

If you do the radon test yourself, carefully follow the testing protocol for your area or EPA’s Radon Testing Checklist. If you hire a contractor to test your home, you’ll protect yourself by hiring a qualified individual or company.

How do you find a qualified professional to do the testing? Ask your home inspector. Also, your state should have an office that deals with radon issues. They may be able to provide you with a list of testers in your area. Many states require radon professionals to be licensed, certified, or registered.

If your state doesn’t regulate radon related services, ask your home inspector or a reliable contractor if he holds a license, or a proficiency or certification credential. Has he completed training in measuring radon and properly dealing with radon issues? You may also want to contact the American Society of Home Inspectors, the National Association of Home Inspectors, or the International Association of Certified Home Inspectors.

Let’s look at the other side of the coin. What if you’re buying a home? The EPA says if you are thinking of buying a home, you can choose to accept an earlier test result from the seller. Or you can ask the seller for a new test to be done by a qualified radon tester.

Before you accept the seller’s test results, ask a few questions. What did previous tests show? Who did the actual testing? Where in the home was the previous testing done? Was it in the level in which you plan to live? Have any changes been made to the home since it was tested? For example, have there been any alterations to the heating and cooling systems?

If you accept the seller’s test results, be sure the test complied with the EPA checklist or relevant state protocols. If you think a new test is needed, discuss it with the seller as soon as possible. If you decide to use a qualified radon tester to have it retested yourself, contact your state radon office for a copy of their approved list of radon testing individuals and companies.

If the seller hasn’t had the home tested, ask that it be done as soon as possible. Consider including radon testing provisions in the contract. Note where in the home the testing will be done and who will do the testing. Also note the type of test to be done and when it will be done. How will the seller and buyer share the test results? Who pays for the cost of testing?

You’ll want to be sure radon testing is done on the level you intend to occupy, whether it’s the first floor or basement area. If you decide to finish or renovate an unfinished area after you buy the home, a radon test should be taken before starting the project and again after the project is finished. Generally, it’s less expensive to install a radon-reduction system before (or during) renovations rather than afterward.

To view more complete information on radon testing from the Environmental Protection agency, go to http://www.epa.gov/radon/radontest.html.

Home Inspection Tips With Free Home Inspection Checklist – Efficient Preparation

When it comes time to sell or appraise your home, you’re going to need a home inspection to make sure that your home is in good condition. When conducting a preliminary inspection of your home, it could really help you to have solid home inspection tips and a free home inspection checklist. Having those tips can show you what to look for and where to look for it, while the checklist will help to ensure that you don’t forget any items or locations. With these tools at hand, you’ll find that you can move through your inspections quickly and efficiently.

Most home inspection tips with free home inspection checklist will break your house up into sections so that you can take the inspection a section at a time, making your inspection more efficient. You can start inspecting by room, from the entry to your home all the way out to the backyard. You certainly don’t want to forget to inspect the outside of your home. Curb appeal is becoming more and more important to potential homebuyers, especially in Boca Raton Woodfield Country Club, making it crucial that you pay attention to the exterior details of your home. You can work your way from front to back, and left to right, depending on the easiest flow of movement through your house.

Within each room, there are a variety of categories you want to check. You want to check the structural elements of the house, any plumbing, the electrical features, and any appliances or system equipment (such as a water heater or HVAC unit). You also want to be sure to check out-of-the-way areas, such as the garage, attic, basement, roof, and the exterior of your home. This is a lot of material to have to cover in each room, so it’s always good to have your home inspection tips with free home inspection checklist handy.

Having an inspection can help you get your house ready to put on the market. You’ll be able to see what you need to fix so that you don’t have to pay an appraiser to come out and provide a list of items to repair and then pay him or her to come out and give you a thumbs-up after you’re done with the work. It’s far more efficient to find these issues on your own. And with some good home inspection tips and a free home inspection checklist, you’ll save a lot of time and money on getting your home in the best possible condition.