Home Inspection: Confirming Accessibility Requirements

Dear Home Seller,

Crawl spaces, attics, furnaces, electric panels… these are a few of the many places where a conscientious home inspector needs to venture, in order to perform a complete and accurate assessment of your house.

Please have your stairwell tidy and free of debris and obstructions, and leave plenty of clearance around the garage door, electrical panel and furnace. If your attic hatch is in a closet, we need to have clothing and other articles removed from the upper shelves, to afford access using a step ladder.

If you have a crawlspace under the house, and the hatch is not readily accessible, we ask that you move any furniture or other items away from this area, and if necessary, roll back the floor coverings to expose the hatch, just prior to the inspection.

No house is perfect, and a home inspection is not intended to identify every little blemish or minute imperfection – however, the conscientious home inspector tries to discover if there are major defects in a home that the purchaser, and perhaps no one else, is aware of – and should also point out the positive aspects of the house.

In the vast majority of cases, we find nothing remarkable, or nothing to criticize, in crawl spaces; however If there is no access to your crawl space, we may not be able to provide your Purchaser with any relevant information about important components, such as foundation walls, floor structure, electrical wiring and the main plumbing system.

Try to understand the purchaser’s point of view… “inaccessible” can mean “unassessable” and therefore may leave a big question mark in the purchaser’s mind.

How would you feel if you were about to make the greatest purchase of your life, and were not given the opportunity to view one of the largest, most important component parts of that purchase?

And remember, you ARE marketing your house – you probably wouldn’t try to sell your car without letting prospective buyers look under the hood. It just makes good sense, to have all areas accessible, so that your purchaser can feel comfortable in the knowledge that there won’t be any unwelcome surprises later on.

Sincerely,

The Home Inspector

To give your home a competitive edge when it’s time to sell, make sure it is in good physical condition. This not only makes your house more attractive and desirable, it also simplifies or eliminates the negotiation process when the time comes for the buyer’s pre-purchase inspection.

To identify which components are most in need of repair, many sellers now enlist the services of a professional home inspector before putting up the FOR SALE sign.

Home Inspection Tips

In this day and age, most people realize the importance of getting a home inspection done prior to buying a property. By doing this, the prospective buyer has the peace of mind knowing exactly what kind of situation they are walking in to. This also allows them to make educated, not emotional, decisions when the choice of whether to buy or not buy needs to be made. You have already made up your mind to have the home inspection done but what now? Here are some helpful tips that will aid you along through the home inspection process.

First, you need to choose the right inspector for the job. This could, by far, be the most important thing you do. In order to get accurate and truthful information on your home inspection, it needs to come from a reliable source. When looking for an inspector to evaluate your property, you will want to choose one who is a trained professional and one that has a lot experience. It is important for them to be familiar to the regulations and guidelines that are native to your area. Beware of hiring an inspector that is not from your state or geographical area. Along with making sure they are licensed and insured, you will want to ask for references and then actually take the next step to check those references. It is vital to make sure you do your homework before you decide which home inspector to hire.

It is also suggested that you are present at the time of the home inspection. This will allow you to tag along with the inspector and really get to see your property through their eyes. Being a trained professional, they are taught to see past all the cosmetic features of your home and really see what lies beneath the surface and give you an unbiased point of view. Also, by being on site during the inspection, you are offered the opportunity to ask any questions that you might have about the process and even discuss the findings as they occur. By shadowing the inspector, you get to see your home in a whole new light.

After each inspection, the client will receive a comprehensive report that details, both good and bad, and outlines all the findings of the home inspection. These report should be in written form-do not accept a verbal report. Most reports include diagrams or even photographs of the areas of concern to thoroughly explain the situation. Be sure to have the inspector review the report with you so that they can address any questions you may have about their findings.

While the thought of a home inspection can be a little daunting, knowing what to expect can help ease you through the process. Remember, if you come across something that you aren’t sure about or it simply doesn’t make sense, just ask! The right home inspector will not have any problems answering your questions and putting your mind at ease.

Home Inspection: Pre-inspected Listings

The future of real estate?

* Home inspections have traditionally been for the benefit of the purchaser.

* Pre-inspected listings benefit all parties – purchasers, vendors and Realtors.

Deals are less likely to fall through.
Home inspections, performed as a condition of the offer, can kill deals – and often needlessly. Sometimes this is because the purchaser gets cold feet; sometimes there’s a big problem no one knew about. Sometimes it is because the house has been misrepresented; sometimes it is because the home inspector scared the purchasers by not explaining that minor and typical problems are just that – minor and typical.

If the home inspection is performed prior to the house being listed, all parties will be aware of the physical condition of the house before an offer is drawn. There will be less likelihood for surprises after the fact. Deals will be less likely to fall through.

Pre-inspected listings can avoid renegotiation.
In a buyer’s market, most houses have to be sold twice. It takes a lot of work to get a signed Agreement of Purchase and Sale… then the home inspection is conducted and the purchaser wants to renegotiate.

If all parties know the condition of the house prior to the offer, there is generally a lesser need for renegotiation. As most Realtors know, renegotiation can be very difficult. Vendors have already mentally sold the house; purchasers are suffering from ‘buyers’ remorse’. Egos, pride and frustration can muddy the already emotional waters.

A vendor who pays for a home inspection will be further ahead than one who has to renegotiate. He or she may even sell their house faster.

Unrealistic vendors.
An inspection at the time of a listing can also help a Realtor deal with a vendor who has unrealistic expectations. The inspection report is good ammunition for explaining why you can’t ask top buck for a house that is not in top condition.

Repairs prior to sale.
Sometimes, the home inspection will reveal items which should be repaired immediately. A pre-inspected listing allows the vendor to repair the problem prior to putting the house on the market.

If the inspection occurs after the Agreement of Purchase and Sale, the purchaser could walk, renegotiate or depending on the inspection clause, the vendor may have the option to make repairs. A repair made by an unmotivated vendor to satisfy the condition may not be the best repair and may not meet the purchaser’s expectations. This has caused more than one deal to not close.

Peace of mind for the purchaser.
There is no doubt that part of the value of a home inspection is a guided tour of the house for the prospective purchaser. Perhaps the inspection company could return to do a walk-through with the purchaser, if requested.

Reputable inspection companies.
Pre-inspected listings will only have value if the home inspector and/or company is perceived to be reputable, qualified and properly insured. Prospective purchasers might have little or no faith in a report created by someone they perceive to be working for the Vendor or Listing Agent.

Editor’s Note: This article is for discussion purposes only and does not represent any policy or opinion on the part of Electrospec or it’s representatives. It is intended only as “food for thought”, and it is hoped that no one will be offended by the suggestive nature of any parts of the article.

Summary.
Does the future of home inspections lie in pre-inspected listings? Will offers be cleaner and deals less likely to be renegotiated or fall through? Will pre-inspection afford purchasers, vendors and Realtors a new measure of equilateral protection?

Hmmm…